Playful Communication Wk 1: Potential Researchers

A couple of my favorites:

a.) Ocean and Glacier Data – Global Sea Level Change
Center for Atmosphere Ocean Science, Dr. David Holland

  • What is the research about?
    • At the Geophysical fluids lab at NYU, Dr. Holland and team study the basic principles of how the Earth’s fluids behave.  The lab collects ocean and glacier data in the field to make climate models in the lab. His research focuses on global sea level change and their impacts on global climate.
    • If the the main ice sheets of Greenland and Antartica even partially disintegrate, the consequences for society are immense.

 


 

b.) Department of Physics and Center for Soft Matter Research, Dr. David Grier

  • What is this research about?
    • Dr. David Grier’s research is using optical tweezers by using lasers to trap atoms and manipulate them.
  • Why would this be a great research topic? 
    • If you have these optical tweezers, you can imagine looking at smoke stacks to see what particles are contributing to pollution. This can also be used for long range space exploration. This is very cutting-edge science that should be better understood and appreciated.
  • Links:

 


 

c.) Department of Biology and Environmental Studies, Dr.Michael R. Rampino

  • What is this research about?
    • His main research has been investigating the role of volcanic eruptions in climatic change. This has involved study of volcanoes in Indonesia and elsewhere around the globe.
  • Why is this research important?
    • This research is important because it relates directly with extinction, the Earth’s changing environment, and the evolution of life. It is both fascinating science and a life-threatening matter that should be illuminated.
  • Links:

 

e.) Massive Star Systems + Star Deaths
Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Benjamin Pope(NASA Sagan Fellow)

  • What is the research about?
    • How do stars die? An international team of scientists have discovered a new, massive star system that challenges our conception of stars. The system, an estimated 8,000 light years away Earth, is adorned with a dust “pinwheel”— whose strangely slow motion suggests current theories on star deaths may be incomplete.
    • ““Apep’s dust pinwheel moves much slower than the wind in the system,” he adds. “One way this can occur is if one of the massive stars is rotating so quickly that it is nearly tearing itself apart. Such a rotation means that when it runs out of fuel and begins to explode as a supernova, it will collapse at the poles before the equator, producing a gamma-ray burst.”
  • Why would this be a great research topic? 
    • This new “Pinwheel” Star system that this (not-exclusive to NYU) team has discovered is a way to explore topics such as: a.) how stars are made and how they die, b.) the taxonomy of stars, and c.) the introduction of this dust pinwheel star and how that affects scientist’s current perception of stars.

 


 

Extra/ Need to Research more:

e.) https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-11/nyu-nna110118.php

f.) https://www.nyu.edu/about/news-publications/news/2018/august/the-behavior-of-water–scientists-find-new-properties-of-h2o.html

g.) The Science Behind Blowing Bubbles, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Dr. Leif Ristroph

  • What is this research about?
    • Researchers at NYU’s Applied Math Lab have uncovered the science behind blowing bubbles. As a physics problem, blowing bubbles is a question of how a liquid film—typically soapy water—interacts with an imposed flow of an external fluid, which is air in the case of bubble blowing.
  • Why would this be a great research topic? 
    • “How is a bubble formed?” is a question that is deceivingly simple. It would be fun to tackle this nostalgic childhood activity through a scientific lens by examining the physics of light and color, the formation of the bubbles, and the forces of the fluid. The science of bubbles is a fun take on a phenomena we often overlook.
  • Links: